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Art Without Death: Russian Cosmism

About This Series

Art Without Death: Russian Cosmism

The conference focuses on the key concepts, continuities, and impact of Russian Cosmism: from Nikolai Fedorov’s philosophy of the “Common Task” — the prime stimulus for the rise of Russian Cosmism — to the significance of Cosmist ideas for the philosophy, literature, and art of the Soviet era; from authors and artists of the Russian avant-garde who envisioned modern technology as the pathway to a society of universal happiness, to contemporary artistic positions indebted to Cosmism and Universalism.

Curated by Boris Groys

Russian Cosmism was a movement that called for material immortality and resurrection, as well as travel to outer space. It developed out of the spirituality of nineteenth-century Russia and a strong fascination with science and technology. The doctrine of immortal life in infinite space captured the optimism of both science and the arts at the time. Since then, the utopian, science fiction-like thinking of the cosmists had a great influence on art, science, and politics in both pre-revolutionary and Soviet Russia.

Image: Anton Vidokle, Immortality and Resurrection for All!, 2017 | film still | Courtesy by the artist

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